In this absolutely fantastic, must-read post for eDiscovery professionals of all experience levels, Craig Ball lays out the full course study guide he gives his eDiscovery and Digital Evidence students at the University of Texas School of Law.  From the concepts, the terminology, the case law and the practice skills, how do you think you would do on Professor Ball’s final exam?

In this post, Craig Ball addresses the following question from a fellow eDiscovery professor, in sum and substance: Can a party refuse to produce “attachments” that are essentially included as links within an email, such as between Gmail and Google Drive? 

Greg Buckles comments further on his tech alert regarding issues with M365. He talks about his own extensive experience working with eDiscovery tech developers and service providers, and the evolving role vendors play in addressing glitches in the tools they support.

With Microsoft retiring their Advanced eDiscovery v.1, some related PowerShell cmdlets and soon the Core eDiscovery interface, I asked the Relativity team for a briefing on how these changes might affect my clients using RelativityOne for in-place holds and collections.

Back in 2014 I wrote a piece on how Avast! pulled personal information from wiped Android phones sold on eBay to demonstrate the dangers of selling off your old smart phone. Now it seems that trading in your iPhone with Apple has not been safe since 2015. The improvements in device encryption may severely limit […]

In this post, Craig Ball continues to highlight the myriad benefits of native productions. This post right here is the exact reason why Craig’s posts are so useful and information. He posts the full, anonymized text of an actual declaration he made to a federal court on behalf of a Defendant who objected to production in TIFF format with load files.